Attendee Movement Data: What Should You Track?

April 23, 2016

Lisa Apolinski

Lisa Apolinski is a professional speaker, blogger, and digital strategist. With her company, 3DogWrite.com, she works with event managers to get their message to attendees, particularly through digital channels, on and off the show floor.

There are great technology advances to monitor where your attendees go on the show floor and in your booth. But, what data pieces are key to track and apply to your trade show marketing strategy?

Where does your attendee go, and linger?  One key element to track with your booth, or conference, to determine how your traffic is faring is actual traffic patterns.  Where do your attendees go, and how do they get there?  Where do they congregate, and what areas are they skipping entirely? 

How they move within your booth can show you dead space, or space where you could add seating, and even some marketing info and booth staff to engage your attendees.

How are your attendees engaging with your demonstrations?  This includes what demonstrations they engage with, how long they stay there, and how they go from one demonstration to the next.

You can also review when you have peak times at your demonstrations, which will affect your booth schedule.  More engagement should equate to more booth staff to chat with those attendees.  Are your assumptions for length of your demo match up with your data? 

If the length of time is too long, you may want to consider breaking up the demo into two parts to keep traffic moving while keeping your attendees interacting.

Who attends your lecture?  It is great to count the number of people who attend your lecture, if you end up being a speaker. 

What is more helpful is to get a list of who attended, including their title and company, so you can follow up with your attendees for any questions or further discussions.  You can also then invite these attendees into your booth to continue the conversation.

Use key attendee movement data points to continue to optimize your booth strategy and your attendee experience.

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Partner Voices

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