Selby Steps Down as Chairman of Diversified Exhibitions Australia

January 4, 2012

Graeme Selby, a 36-year veteran of the exhibition industry, has stepped down from his post as chairman of Diversified Exhibitions Australia, according to its parent company, Diversified Business Communications.

Selby was managing director of Australian Exhibition Services (AES) from 1982 until 2005, when he became chairman, and focused on spearheading business development opportunities in Australia, India, Hong Kong and China.

“When Diversified had the good fortune to acquire AES in 2000, we were even more fortunate to have Graeme Selby join our team,” said Nancy Hasselback, president & CEO of Diversified Business Communications.  

She added, “Graeme’s ability to acquire and launch strong properties, extensively grow and strengthen our portfolio, and nurture our team, has resulted in Diversified becoming a leading company in Australia and Asia.”

Selby was instrumental in not only growing Diversfied’s Australian portfolio, acquiring shows such as the Good Food & Wine Show, the Australian Fitness & Health Expo, the Security Expo and the Australian Oil & Gas Exhibition, but he also helped the company expand into the Asia-Pacific region, specifically in China and India, where a new division launched – Diversified Communications India.

Selby began his exhibition industry career in London with the Montgomery Group and, after a six-year stint with the company, Selby returned to Australia in 1982 and founded the Australian Exhibition Services Pty Ltd (AES) with the backing of the Montgomery Group.

In 2000, AES was sold to Portland, Maine-based Diversified Business Communications, and in 2004, it was rebranded Diversified Exhibitions Australia.

Selby also was the inaugural chairman of the Exhibition & Event Association of Australia, a position he filled on three separate occasions.

Selby is based in Melbourne and plans to remain in the exhibition industry and to utilize his experience with the trade show industry in the U.K., the Middle East, Australia and Asia, according to Diversified Business Communications officials.

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