New Guide from ESPA Highlights Value of Event Service Teams

August 14, 2019

Everyone who works within the trade show and meetings industry recognizes the value that events — and all the individuals involved with helping to make them successful — bring to the table. But sometimes, those outside the industry don’t understand this quite as well. To remedy that, Event Service Professionals Association has launched a guide that showcases the expertise that event service professionals provide.

Consider “ROI of the Event Service Professional: ESPA’s Guide to Showcasing the Impact and Value of Event Service” the latest tool in your arsenal for demonstrating the value of, as well as the breadth of, event services that can be shared with management and stakeholders. 

“Research has shown that event service professionals have a significant impact on event success, but prior to now, most of us struggled with how to show and prove that value,” said Julie Brakenbury, director of services for the Greater Raleigh CVB who led development of the guide. “Showing our value is very important to ensure we have the budget and resources to do our jobs well.”

She continued, “Organizations, venues and hotels all spend significant money marketing and selling to book events. If those events aren’t serviced well, they don’t return, and then those same entities go about spending even more money to market and sell and book more events.”

Event services managers at hotels, convention centers and CVBs work hard to manage all the logistics on an event, essentially bringing to life what the sales team has sold. They handle everything from coordinating F&B, audiovisual and outside vendors to connecting with local resources, providing expertise and coming up with creative solutions to logistical problems. They also put in long hours on-site, working closely with meeting planners to ensure the events run smoothly.

Often, that all can be easier said than done — and in that respect, these event services teams have a huge impact on meeting planner satisfaction, which ultimately impacts revenue and growth for their respective organization.

“The measurement of our work improves the services we provide and the results we bring to the organization and the event,” said Jamie Huckleberry, ESPA president and director of event services at David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh. “It helps to identify if we are staffed appropriately and recognizes the work being done.”

She added, “I have always considered us the on-site salesman in services. If the event doesn’t run well, the group won’t want to return. This all has an economic impact on the city and improving event services improves that impact.”

To download the free guide and learn more, go here.

Image credit: ESPA, showing Julie Brakenbury at left.

 

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