A Telephone Calling Script for Exhibitors

December 20, 2014

Shift from cold calls to connect calls. Using this script below you will be able to  show your prospects that you understand their pain points.

Following up on leads you gathered at a trade show can be challenging. If you took the time to take notes on your interaction that will make things easier. You’ll know what products they have shown interest and whether they are ready to move forward.

Keeping the notes you made in mind, here are some additional questions that will show your prospects that you have their needs in mind, not yours.

“A lot of time, when I talk to companies like yours, they’re really good at ________, but they struggle to ________ for the following reasons: _____, _____, or _____.”

·       “That’s something that I’ve helped a lot of similar companies overcome. If that’s something we could give you some guidance about, would you be open to receiving and implementing our help?”
 

·       Use the prospect’s recent actions as a conversation starting point: “I noticed that you downloaded our ebook on XYZ best practices. What were you looking for help with when you stumbled upon that ebook? What’d you think of it?”

·      
Cold calls should be about those you call, not you. Always check Linkedin before making a cold call.
 

If you use Linkedin and Twitter your cold calls don’t have to feel like cold calls because you know something about them and can possibly relate on a human level.

The prospect could be a neighbor, went to the same school, have the same hobby.

Be open with the people when you call about having looked at their LinkedIn profiles. It helps break the ice. Plus it shows you’ve gone to more trouble than 90% of the other salespeople who call them every day. “I noticed on your Linkedin profile that we grew up in the same town!”

Discover the do’s and don’t’s of tradeshow selling with the New Rules of Tradeshow Selling, download it free here.

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